, a master’s and Ph.D. degree holder at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and is now is an assistant professor in the physics department at Tuskegee University,  recently won a $1.1 million grant to further develop her patent-pending technology for using laser-activated nanoparticles to treat .

Green is remarked for winning a large grant at a relatively young age, and for being black and female in a field dominated by white men. She says,

“There are so many people who only get a three-month or six-month survival benefit from the drugs they take. Then three or six months later, they’re sent home with no hope, nothing else we can do. Those are the patients I want to try to save, the ones where regular medicine isn’t effective for them.”

The way the technology works is that an FDA-approved drug containing nanoparticles is injected into a cancer patient and causes the patient’s tumor to fluoresce (glow) under imaging equipment. The goal is for a laser to activate the nanoparticles by heating them.

As a physicist, Green created a physical treatment that is not specific to the biology of cancer. she said. “It’s a platform technology. It’s not cancer type-specific, though it can treat cancer specifically. That’s a concept my friends who are biologists struggle with.”

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